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As I work on next week's , lemme just plug my Ko-Fi account here. My work is a hobby that I do for free alongside full-time PhD studies, so if you enjoy the content I create and want to throw a few quid my way, I appreciate it! It helps pay for my website domain, among other things (like coffee to power my writing!).

ko-fi.com/archaeologyfitz

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ArchaeoAnimals is live! Its my new from the Archaeology Podcast Network. We'll be dropping new episodes every first Tuesday of the month and covering all things zooarchaeology - from ancient farm animals to weird dog skulls!

Check out our newest episodes now: archaeologypodcastnetwork.com/

Our latest episode of is now live! We talk about chickens, why they’re so fascinating in the archaeological record, and then possible ruin our own integrity with bad chicken jokes.

Download wherever you get your podcasts or listen at our website: archaeologypodcastnetwork.com/

Our latest episode of ArchaeoAnimals is up! We talk about horses, why they’re so terrifying, and interview two researchers, Runar Leifsson and Albina Hulda Palsdottir, on their recent research on Icelandic Horses. ‬

Download directly from our website or from wherever you download your podcasts.

archaeologypodcastnetwork.com/

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Our latest episode is out now! We talk about ritual archaeology, why it’s so complicated, and how animal bones factor in.

Like, Subscribe, and Download from wherever you get your podcasts!

archaeologypodcastnetwork.com/

On the latest episode of , we’re talking all about our favourite furry friend: cats! 🐱 Tune in to hear all about and the hard past lives they’ve had.
archaeologypodcastnetwork.com/

Hey folks! Today's blog post (on animal butchery and of course) will be my last one for a bit - due to PhD work becoming a bit overwhelming, I'm taking a month long hiatus on the blog. In the meantime: animalarchaeology.com/2019/01/

This week's blog post is based on a recent paper I presented at the 2018 Theoretical Archaeology Group conference: how can we incorporate a little anarchy into archaeology? Click the link to find out!

animalarchaeology.com/2019/01/

This week on the blog we return to neo-paganism and talk about Heathenry, the Alt-Right, and why archaeologists should be paying attention to the discourse between (and overlapping) these groups. animalarchaeology.com/2019/01/

Our first episode of the 2019 is now available to download from the Archaeology Podcast Network or whenever you get your podcasts.

We’re talking all things cows in this episode! From domestication to rituals, with lots of tangents about Knickers the giant celebrity steer in between. Download today!

archaeologypodcastnetwork.com/

Happy holidays and shout out to my parents who decided to troll their zooarchaeologist daughter by gifting her two of the worst looking, inaccurate skeletal models.

Perhaps a bit blasphemous to post a Twitter link on Mastadon, but I just finished up presenting my paper on and for this year's conference. If you missed it, I made it into a Twitter Moment here: twitter.com/i/moments/10750308

After realising that I don't write enough about on my blog which is literally called "Animal Archaeology", I've written a short and silly overview of gnaw marks on animal bones: animalarchaeology.com/2018/12/

Because of the ridiculous amount of time I've spent this week playing , this week's blog post looks at how selective breeding works in both Pokemon and in real life history using the zooarchaeological record! animalarchaeology.com/2018/12/

We have a special new crossover episode today! We talked with the ArchyFantasies podcast about cryptozoology, how zooarchaeology can be misused for pseudo-archaeological science, and our favourite cryptids and hoaxes!

Be sure to Subscribe to on iTunes, Google Play, or Stitcher - or listen directly from our website below:

archaeologypodcastnetwork.com/

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Scholar Social

Scholar Social is a microblogging platform for researchers, grad students, librarians, archivists, undergrads, academically inclined high schoolers, educators of all levels, journal editors, research assistants, professors, administrators—anyone involved in academia who is willing to engage with others respectfully. Read more ...