I think a lot about how rural rage makes a lot of sense and how leftists are really fucking up by giving up on rural areas.
But then the leftists I know living and working in rural red areas have been called 'far right sympathizers' because they're in it for the long haul changing people's minds and doing solidarity work rather than...just argue with people. Be their neighbor. Work with em. Live with em. Be in community.

@Cyborgneticz I think there's a lot of this, for sure. but as someone who grew up in a rural area, I had to leave and move to a big center for my own safety. there's only so much abuse and direct threats of violence you can take before you have to give up on these folks. you can't help those who don't want it, you know?

it sucks that they're getting left behind, but they also ensure that it happens that way because they beat down any source of help.

@Cyborgneticz you can basically only help them if you're a cishet white dude. and in that case they will take your help and ignore your progressive messages anyway. I spent all of my 20s doing that work, when I appeared to be a cishet white dude. and it was 100% a waste of time. I'm definitely someone who burnt out on putting that effort in and has given up on rural areas. not because I wanted it to be that way, but because *they* did.

it's really sad.

@tessaracht That is real valid.
I will say that has not been my experience, and a lot of the folks I know doing that work are trans people who grew up there and have been home for like 20 years n doing things. But communities are all different and aren't monoliths. The problem is that people approach places as monolithic

@Cyborgneticz yeah! like, if you can make headway in the communities you have access to, then fuckin' go for it. I can only speak for rural Saskatchewan, Canada, and it's a fuckin' nightmare. cops stripping indigenous folks nude so they freeze to death and farmers voting to destroy their own farms and my parents back there unable to convince these folks to just wear a damn mask so they stop dying.

my parents have been fighting this for 60 years and even they are gonna finally leave.

@tessaracht Yeah that sounds like a horrifying place to be in and incredibly frustrating. I totally understand burnout from that. My knowledge and experience comes from the American Deep South.
I'm actually getting burnt out from the city politics where it requires a lot of talking very proper and being popular enough to be heard. Cajun country is also really wild.

@Cyborgneticz yeah. we do a lot of harm to ourselves on the left by not trying to unify with movements we were part of in the past (like labour, omg, so many missed opportunities these days) and poor areas and stuff, and just infighting with ourselves.

ultimately we'll win people over by actions, not arguing, and I totally agree with that sentiment. but we gotta work on the places that actually want our help, demonstrate that we can affect real change, and then we can win over the rest.

@tessaracht I agree, and I know plenty of places that want help and are receptive. Gotta have those networks, and I know me and my friends have built a lot of them from crisis aid.

The infighting is SO exhausting. Like I just don't care about most of the arguments. I just want to get people fed and clothed and homed.

@Cyborgneticz SERIOUSLY. nuance can be important at some stage, but it's very much a hierarchy of needs thing. we can hash out these details once people are safe and secure. until then, nothing else really matters.

@tessaracht Exactly. We need to triage this situation, and presently I don't particularly care about most of the fighting

@Cyborgneticz @tessaracht A friend once said to me, “I look forward to debating with you where, exactly, we should plant the flowers and which ones in this beautiful garden we both want to build… but we need to do some serious weeding first.” And I liked those words.

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