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Boredom is good. Children. Teaching 

Something I've been noticing teaching is that the usage of cell phones and iPads from a young age has led to an inability to cope with boredom.

Boredom is good! It can force you to be creative. Most of the times I was bored as a kid and now lead to explorations or reading or whatnot, sometimes a nap.

But with increased tech access from a young age there's less ability to cope with being bored
So teaching then becomes "make sure you can entertain children" 1/?

Boredom 2. 

Which is a disservice to kids and teachers.

Part of coping for boredom is giving you the skills to deal with times when things aren't coming easily.
So the ability to get through something difficult and not fun is deeply important to just being a person.

I'm real worried about the ramifications of this.
I can't fix what happens when parents gave their child an iPad as a toddler and now that kid struggles to sustain focus and lacks mental stamina.

Boredom 2. 

@Cyborgneticz I was bored in class as a kid, pre-ipad, pre-cell phone even, so I mostly read quietly to myself. The fact that I was reading a book and not social media or whatever didn't help me graduate 🤷‍♀️

Boredom 2. 

@Cyborgneticz I'm even worried about how these devices are impacting me as an adult.

It would be good if we had more awareness of these issues and a more societal level sense of what is acceptable or desirable way to use these devices with toddlers and children as they grow. (And support for parents, not just guilt.)

Right now it feels like there is pressure to give children things like phones as early as possible. Personally, I'm on board with things like:

waituntil8th.org/

Boredom 2. 

@Cyborgneticz We don't have a tablet in the home, but my kiddo has on occasion been given one to play with by visiting family. Even when playing "age appropriate" educational games, I see their behavior change in negative ways. So I'm going to wait as long as I can, and try to be very deliberate in how I introduce devices. But I know at some point outside pressure is going to push me to get them a phone before I am ready to (I already dealt with this with a now adult child.)

Boredom 2. 

@cstanhope In many ways I'm lucky that I won't have children so that's not something I'm worried about as a parent.
But as a teacher...it's so concerning. I'm tethered to tech because of epilepsy, but I try to minimize it how I can.
It's hard. Tech is definitely so addictive, and I worry about what that means long term.

I think there's a cultural problem with the Need to get new tech that is just pervasive. The only tech I legitimately need is my VNS.

Boredom is good. Children. Teaching 

@Cyborgneticz I've said this before on here, but the time after students have finished their state tests but before we collect the scratch paper is a font of creativity. They draw all kinds of things on the papers without fear of messing up because they know we have to collect them all anyway.

Boredom is good. Children. Teaching 

@crash I believe it!!

Boredom is good. Children. Teaching 

@morre @Cyborgneticz Perhaps I'm misinterpreting the original comment, but my takeaway was "Without a constant song and dance from educators, students will make their own fun and it will be very creative."

I don't deny my students the tools to be creative. I just don't want them watching YouTube for the entire class to stem off boredom when we can make our own videos to do the same.

It's how I got started, after all, and I'm not exactly neurotypical myself.

Boredom is good. Children. Teaching 

@crash that other persons comment doesn't show up for me 🤷

Boredom is good. Children. Teaching 

@Cyborgneticz Same thing with many adults, usually in their twenties. If something is boring, like learning to use Microsoft Word, or especially Excel, they soon start falling asleep.

Boredom is good. Children. Teaching 

@devinprater That makes sense. I feel like as tech became easier to access younger and younger expectations for education changed which have created this larger issue.
Not great

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