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So if I want to "live" in one instance of Mastodon, but want to follow the stream of another instance, is that possible?

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@DonnaLanclos Yes. As you follow people, you'll see more and more posts from various instances, and as you follow/interact with them, your connections grow. It takes some time but it will happen.

@DonnaLanclos Absolutely. If you can see a toot from someone you wanna follow, just click the person-shaped icon.

Otherwise, search for the person with their handle and instance (frex you are @DonnaLanclos) and add them.

Complication: some servers shun other servers. I've yet to have this be a problem though.

@DonnaLanclos gah display issue

you are @/DonnaLanclos@/scholar.social minus the slashes.

@dsalo so I have to know people's instances to search for them?

@DonnaLanclos @dsalo not necessarily if you know their name, e.g. you can search for dsalo and the interface should show all the dsalo people.

@DonnaLanclos if they have a consistent handle you can try searching it? yeah, what Ruth said

@dsalo OK followup, what is the difference between local and federated feeds

@DonnaLanclos from a UX pov not much really

think of it like email addresses, there are ones in your org and ones outside it

but you can generally email both kinds

the Mastodon "local" feed is for super-tight communities, best I can tell

@dsalo @DonnaLanclos “Local” is everyone on your server. “Federated” is everyone on your server plus everyone each of them follows on other servers.

In some circumstances servers run “relays” which means federated is everyone on a federated (relayed) server even if nobody on your server follows them.

@DonnaLanclos @dsalo local is for ur own instance that's public (the world icon on your toot there)-- ex. i'm also on scholar.soc and checked the local timeline to see this post. federated is... every public post that the instance recieves, i think

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Scholar Social

Scholar Social is a microblogging platform for researchers, grad students, librarians, archivists, undergrads, academically inclined high schoolers, educators of all levels, journal editors, research assistants, professors, administrators—anyone involved in academia who is willing to engage with others respectfully.