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Hi y'all, I'm an education PhD student who is interested in critical explorations of . I am critical of how teachers/professors use edtech and its effects on learning environments. Looking forward to really leaning into this community and program.

Opinion on News 

I would have been flagged every time as a cheater with these systems today. Who doesn't look away from the test they're taking? Next, it'll be directions against closing your eyes because you might have answers imprinted on your eyelids..
While this is tragic for the woman involved, the bigger question is "Why do we keep giving tests that are so easy to cheat on?" We should devise assessments that require original responses, especially in upper levels.

nytimes.com/2022/05/27/technol

I've taken a few of those thoughts I've had rattling around since that AERA session and put it into words in a blog post.

You can read it here: civicsoftechnology.org/blog/of

Civics of Technology is not my project but something I have been contributing to. A goal of it is to build up a useful tool for educators who want to teach *about* technology rather than just *with* technology. The main assumption is that neither technologies nor the societies that make them are neutral.

Ryan boosted

Mastotip: If you tag person x in a DM with person y, both x and y will be able to see what you said. A common workaround is to put spaces between the @ sign and the username (I.e. @ sandrockcstm @ orbitalstation.one).

This is really key if you are discussing a moderation related issue with an admin, say if person x is harassing you. If you tag that person you can inadvertently get them to see the conversation. This is not clear from the UI and a common trap for new users.

New publication out!

digitalcommons.library.umaine.

This study challenges the idea that a performance evaluation and professional growth rubric for teachers can function as a boundary object. We present findings that show mediated understandings of good teaching collide with expectations of good teaching as defined by the rubric. Broadly, rubrics like this fail to consider the complexity of systems while recognizing the social aspect of learning and teaching.

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Ryan boosted

To help some of the newcomers make connections: name 5–7 things that interest you but aren't in your profile, as tags so they are searchable. Then boost this post or repeat its instructions so others know to do the same.








:TipHat:

@louce
I would love to read some of your work about the political implications of big tech. I co-authored a paper about Google's education suite and touched on the shortcomings of US laws in protecting student privacy.

When thinking about , educators ask, "What can this do FOR me?" There's nothing wrong with this question and there are several great frameworks out there for helping determine what a piece of technology can do. PICRAT, SAMR, and TPACK are three examples that come to mind.

What frameworks are out there to help answer, "What does this technology do TO me?" I've been building out a framework that may help answer this question of relationship to technology.

Is this something you want?

Ryan boosted

In a leaked internal document obtained by Motherboard, #Facebook privacy engineers on the Ad and Business Product team wrote, "We do not have an adequate level of control and explainability over how our systems use data, and thus we can't confidently make controlled policy changes or external commitments such as 'we will not use X data for Y purpose.'" vice.com/en/article/akvmke/fac

Hi y'all, I'm an education PhD student who is interested in critical explorations of . I am critical of how teachers/professors use edtech and its effects on learning environments. Looking forward to really leaning into this community and program.

Went to a presentation about automated writing evaluation at today. They waxed poetic about what their model could do and all it's benefits but left off harms. I asked what potential harms might be: that teachers might be too reliant on them... Nothing about changing teacher workloads, teachers questioning their judgement, writing being molded to suit an algorithm, further deprofessionalization of teachers... Disappointing...but expected.

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