amalie boosted
it's very weird to me being an unemployed 20yo who's just hoping and praying she'll be able to get a waitressing job soon interacting with software engineers for nuclear power plants and people who work on major linux distributions and shit like that on here

that's honestly one of the most incredible things about the fediverse to me, that it's small enough that there's just no barriers for that sort of thing, when i can't see that happening the same way on any of the centralized silos I've been on in the past

imposter syndrome 

Is anyone going to ESA in New Orleans next week? Hit me up!

this run crashed on christmas (time seriiiiiiiiiiiiies)

if anyone will be in New Orleans Aug 5-15, let me know

I'm going to the ESA annual meeting (giving a talk on Weds!), and would love to meet people :)

Leaving a not responding program open in the vague hope that at some point it will decide to respond again

research is:
mistakenly deciding to run something locally and then frantically closing tabs to give RStudio more RAM on the offchance it won't crash

:x

hey does anyone have good resources for teaching yourself simulation in an object-oriented language? C++ much preferred, python gives me hives.

(this is actually unrelated to my R toot earlier I just have a thing that will work best in an object oriented language)

my "stop normalizing working on the weekend" toot is still getting a lot of traction

I still believe in it

it may be healthier for you, personally, to work on the weekend (working more, shorter, days), but there's a big difference between "better for me" and "a healthy norm"

silly things I have done workwise today:
> pasted my entire r script into the address bar for some reason (I wasn't even trying to navigate somewhere it just happened)
> crashed rstudio
> overwrote a function instead of calling it

my brain is not really "on"

Mosquitos probing through a net: i.imgur.com/Adu9PV7.gifv

COOL gif but also GROSS

*goes back to parameterizing her model*

hey can academics stop normalizing working on the weekends please? thanks.

ftr this is not a rag on my boss it's just amusing to me that someone leaves it until the last day of the semester in a modeling class before realizing they don't get that.

boss explaining to some students the difference between a variable and a parameter ... on the last day of the semester.

(How do you explain that, tbh?)

Also.

I suspect before I showed up, new lab had lab meetings with seriously detailed powerpoints.

Since I showed up, we've been small enough that stopped.

With several new grad students having accepted offers here, I'm worried that will start again.

BAN POWERPOINTS (they are not effective ways to convey information in a collaborative framework).

literally hitting the point where I'm sorting my "papers to read" list in my dreams.

This is not ideal.

anyway, ML is a hot topic in biology right now. Some cool regression tree/random forest projects are happening.

BUT in most public health cases we have

1) small data
2) human decision makers who make decisions without clearly stated objectives

so uh. ML isn't necessarily gonna get us anything.

More recently, we simulated a metapopulation with a gradient of coverage and two primary regions - one chunk of locales where disease had been eliminated and another where it was on the route to elimination.

We tried to classify those regions using a neural network.

That also failed (although I think a friend's still working on it).

At one point we tried to use reinforcement learning to discover a heuristic for when you should switch from your "achieving" strategy to your "maintaining" strategy along a gradient of vaccination coverage, using some immune summary statistics as state space.

In the end we got out some facts about our model for disease/immunity and no useful heuristic.

It turns out machine learning is not great for discovering heuristics.

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