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On nerd victimhood 

Myth: Nerds were bullied in high school for being smart

Reality: Self-styled "nerds" were mostly ignored in high school because of the low value they placed on interpersonal relationships, but due to their feelings of entitlement to high social status and an artificial and strongly sought-after victimhood that they picked up from mass media depictions of the "bullied nerd," they have re-cast childhood inconveniences in those terms in order to win arguments on the internet

On nerd victimhood 

Straight white male self-identified "nerds": I know what it's like to be bullied for who you are, and I think that—

Me, a grown-up, who still gets threats and stuff thrown at him in public for holding his bf's hand in public: I'm sorry, all I can hear is teacher-from-Charlie-Brown noises from you now

On nerd victimhood 

@bgcarlisle I don't think I agree, but your point is well made and worth considering.

On nerd victimhood 

@bgcarlisle
This. I don't self-identity as a nerd because of the numerous people I've met who do that so they can bully what they call "normal people." High school was fine for me because I had several close friends and mostly wasn't harassed except by a few idiots who also mostly were ignored. I know people who were bullied and many were a cycle of acting entitled because they were bullied and bullied because they were acting entitled.

On nerd victimhood 

@bgcarlisle sounds like the perfect issue to approach on an on-case basis...

On nerd victimhood 

@bgcarlisle In retrospect, everyone who was bullied for being a nerd in my highschool had some other thing going on. Queer, PoC, and autism-spectrum kids were bullied for being nerds despite getting average grades and being into the same "nerdy" things half the kids in school were into. Because it was never about being smart or being super into some media property or hobby.

On nerd victimhood 

@bunnyjane @bgcarlisle big this, I think a lot of autism-related bullying gets mislabeled as nerd-related bullying, and in media you often get "nerd" characters loosely coded as autistic

socially inept? really interested in a particular thing? maybe ~comically~ sensitive?

clearly sounds like a nerd, couldn't be anything else

On nerd victimhood 

@bunnyjane @bgcarlisle Yeah, back in the 90s being nerdy was associated with gender nonconformity and queerness, which makes hypermasc, violent, closeminded dudes claiming ownership over it a real trip.

On nerd victimhood 

@bgcarlisle I had a wonderful high school experience as one of the "smart" nerds. Got lumped in with the rich overachiever kids and was really well liked.

I think having such a good experience made me realize nerd victimhood was bullshit and helped me avoid the worst of it.

I'm thankful that I didn't slip down that slope.

On nerd victimhood 

@bgcarlisle I wrote out a whole thing that just ended up sounding preachy but tldr “being a nerd” and “being autistic” overlap a LOT and it’s important to put that into account

On nerd victimhood 

@FirstProgenitor Yeah I would agree, of course

I'm talking here more about the very common, feigned and retroactively self-designated faux victimhood that many people who are not autistic use to bludgeon away consideration for the experiences of women, people of colour and queer people by reducing it all to "bullying"

Which is also a real thing and needs to be addressed, and I think it can be, without further making things harder for those who are autistic

On nerd victimhood 

@bgcarlisle I'm pretty sure I was bullied in school for having good grades and actually caring about the stuff they taught us. I was also an outcast who liked anime, but I'm pretty sure I'm not autistic and it had nothing to do with my queerness.
So, I find the above blanket statement kinda untrue and actually hurtful. Just as a bit of personal feedback.

On nerd victimhood 

@NerdResa Okay, then this doesn't apply to you

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