Christina Hendricks is a user on scholar.social. You can follow them or interact with them if you have an account anywhere in the fediverse. If you don't, you can sign up here.

Christina Hendricks @[email protected]

Stages of Mastodon:

1. Toots about Mastodon vs. Twitter
2. Toots about Mastodon etiquette
3. Toots about finding people on other Mastodon instances
4. Toots about moving to other Mastodon instances
5. Meaningful conversations with awesome people.
6. Laments about not ditching Twitter OR going dark to return to Twitter
7. Leaving Twitter

As with the stages of grief, order may vary and repetition is possible.

May all your toots be Stage 5.

Gakushuin ISS is looking for a part-time teacher for an academic reading & writing course (twice a week on Tuesday and Friday mornings, Period 1 and 2) to start in April 2018. The minimum requirement is a Master's degree and relevant experience in teaching at Japanese universities. Ping me.

I'm seeing more mentions on here of the Internet of Things, but no mentions at all of the Internet of People or the Internet of Places.

I mean, there's so much more to the Internet of Nouns than just things...

it still blows my mind that there are people all around the world sitting at some sort of device and writing their thoughts into the ether and by sheer "magic" i can see them. there are so many people out there, all of them doing such different things, and with lives just as rich as my own. and somehow you're all excellent.

maybe some of you will read this and be like oh yeah that 0x3f is a person too somewhere, and right this is what they said

food insecurity Show more

we should all write lists of all the webcomics, podcasts, blogs and other hard-to-backtrace influential works that have affected us, so as to make life easier for future academics who want to backtrace our general intellectual milieu

@aqsalose Excellent! So glad you are finding stuff useful. We are reading the freebie versions of Euthyphro & Apology. The translations aren’t quite as good as the book you have, but they’re ok for intro level and they’re, well, free!

My course site for Intro to Philosophy is up and running! blogs.ubc.ca/phil102

We're starting with Plato & Socrates, next week. This past week was just one course meeting, introducing the course overall.

@Holly Yes, me too. The problem is that it starts for us really early (started today). So it feels like we just finished last term (which we did, Dec. 22) and then it's time to start up again!

But I got most of it done for today's class so I feel okay about it so far!

@logarithmic_function Thank you! I did manage to get most everything ready in time for class today. More work the rest of the week to finish it all, but most of the prep work is done!

@afterthehyphen @thelibrarian I host mine on Reclaim Hosting and I love it. I know the people behind it well and they are wonderful people. The support is awesome. They are doing Good Things in the world!

Classes start in two days and I am waaaaayyyy behind in being ready to teach. Yikes. Still making last minute decisions on what kinds of assignments to have and what readings to assign. And I haven't yet finished my website nor the videos I am making to introduce Socrates and Plato next week.

Going to be a long next couple of days...

For those in need of a guilt-free laugh:

My job this morning: to make the pudding. Strawberry tart mmm!
did my typing, other jobs, made the pastry & popped it in the oven with a light layer of my homemade strawberry jam. Fresh berries go on top.

I had to pop out for a village meeting: 'Honey, take that out in 20 mins please.'

I arrive home:
Daddy set the tart on fire?

REAL FIRE!? Where is it now?

In the garden

at least I made a double recipe...
#smallstories #food
mastodon.social/media/JcRgr_lY

I found this great resource for : a list of texts one might use for teaching university courses, from traditions and people not in the usual list of what is taught. From Bryan Van Norden: bryanvannorden.com/suggestions

York University (Ontario, Canada) on requiring students to pay for digital ancillary resources like homework tools—can’t count for more than 15% of course grade, has to be purchasable separate from book, & more. teachingcommons.yorku.ca/wp-co

U Toronto has similar policy: provost.utoronto.ca/Assets/Pro

The Ministry of Higher Ed in Ontario considers tuition to cover instruction & assessment, so adding digital assessment tools is like making students pay on top of what already paying for tuition.

Spent quite a few hours today uploading pre-prints to the new PhilArchive philarchive.org

It’s stuff I published in philosophy before I started publishing open access.

Too bad they don’t take presentation slides. Still posting those to a combination of Open Science Framework (for editable ppt version) and Speaker Deck (for embeddable, but not easily editable, PDFs). And both on my blog blogs.ubc.ca/chendricks

Spent quite a few hours today uploading pre-prints to the new PhilArchive philarchive.org

It’s stuff I published in philosophy before I started publishing open access.

Too bad they don’t take presentation slides. Still posting those to a combination of Open Science Framework (for editable ppt version) and Speaker Deck (for embeddable, but not easily editable, PDFs).

Spent quite a few hours today uploading pre-prints to the new PhilArchive philarchive.org

It’s stuff I published in philosophy before I started publishing open access.

Too bad they don’t take presentation slides. Still posting those to a combination of Open Science Framework (for editable ppt version) and Speaker Deck (for embeddable, but not easily editable, PDFs).

@ton I learn a lot from working with grad student TA’s (not all teachers have that opportunity though). They often have good ideas that I take on myself. I’m acting as a mentor for one right now that is seriously inspiring for me and providing me with new things to get me out of my routines.

Otherwise, I attend lots of professional development workshops for new things too.