Study guide Q 

Do you provide them? Why or why not?

Study guide Q 

@drb generally yes, but how detailed that guide is tends to vary on the type of test and the thing i think the test should be testing. in general students see these as an accessibility feature and they can be used to facilitate a dialogue between student and teacher about what students should know. students can also abuse and misuse them, but i've never really seen those reasons as justification for withholding something like this.

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Study guide Q 

@ibull Thanks! I've had students ask about them recently and I didn't know how to respond. I've never prepared one before, and I never had one as a student myself so I'm not really sure what they typically look like.

Study guide Q 

@drb honestly they are usually pretty skimpy on details. usually sufficient: a list of key terms, events, or concepts that students can expect to be tested on. students should be able to cross reference this with textbooks, assigned articles, or lecture notes.

Study guide Q 

@ibull By that description, I'm basically already providing that. I provide a semester agenda that lists the daily topic and related readings or text sections. I'll have to think about this. Maybe it needs to be more explicit somehow. Thanks for your input!

Study guide Q 

@drb Perhaps! I think most of the things that are self-evident in our organization of course materials are only this way to us. Students surprise me all the time in the way they apply logic and infer reasoning. In my experience some folks just need some manufactured redundancy ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

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