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What would be good workflows for commenting work-in-progress academic texts that don't rely on Microsoft Word or Google Docs? Would love to hear suggestions.

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@jaranta When I send people PDFs they often write comments and usually that works out fine.

I write notes to myself in `<!-- -->` in markdown files and sometimes use a script to turn them into marginal notes. I think I got that idea from somebody here.

I like the idea of CriticMarkup but I have never used it seriously.
criticmarkup.com/

@twsh I guess that's the most obvious solution.

I also use comments in markdown files, but wouldn't force that or CriticMarkup on anyone else.

@twsh I was also thinking of cryptpad, but I'm wary of 1) things on other people's servers 2) forcing new workflows on people.

@jaranta The open source Okular PDF reader allows you to make annotations, highlights, etc in PDF files. I usually use that when reviewing text.

@abs Oddly enough, PDF files seem to be the most common shared format for files. I guess this could be the easiest way.

@jaranta
Back when editorially.com was still a thing (for like a minute before it was acquired) you could annotate markdown documents and also submit edits for review through a pull request-like process. It was pretty good and I used it with two collaborators once to write a short piece.

I think draftin.com may still have a feature like that, but I have yet to find a co-author/collaborator I can use that process with. Also, I'm a little wary of lock-in.

@jboy Yeah, I prefer workflows that don't require me to have all my work on someone else's server.

I was hoping for solutions that don't involve me forcing other people to adopt new ways of working. I tried that once with Authorea and I don't think either of us was very happy with that.

@jaranta sometimes I joke that I'm only going to write with people that have mastered git workflow from now on. But not a lot of social scientists would clear that bar...

@jboy I think you would also need something like Git(hub/lab) with that for comments etc.

@jaranta no, you could do it entirely through commit messages and branches.

@jboy I dread the idea of having an extended discussion of some complex change through commit messages.

@jaranta
Granted, but if the alternative is discussion spread across msword comments, track changes, Google docs, emails, and Twitter DMs, it might not be so bad...

@jaranta There's always comments and track changes in LibreOffice, if that's not too close to Word for your tastes

@bgcarlisle @jaranta itโ€™s difficult if your co-authors arenโ€™t willing to try LaTeX, but if they are, overleaf can work well for collaborative writing overleaf.com/ Itโ€™s not FLOSSy, but swings and roundabouts.

@ben_hr I've actually used it previously with some co-authors. As a LaTeX editor, it's really good and I liked working with it. The problem is the "as a LaTeX editor"-part.

@bgcarlisle It's a step up, but mentally I categorised it in the "Word" category and that's why I didn't mention it explicitly.

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