Pokémon Go, new study 

A paper we've been working for a while is out:

"Exploring Features of the Pervasive Game Pokémon GO That Enable Behavior Change: Qualitative Study"

We studied how different game features were tied to changes in people's reported behavior. Takeway:

"The respondents reported being more social, expressed more positive emotions, found more meaningfulness in their routines, and had increased motivation to explore their surroundings."

doi.org/10.2196/15967

Game studies, conference call, workshop 

Interested in ? Thinking of coming to DiGRA2020? Come join us in the Ludic Unreliability workshop and chat with us about all the ways games mislead us.

digra2020.org/workshops/

game studies presentation 

We're having our project's seminar today and this means starting the day with sandwiches while listening to a keynote about food in Dwarf Fortress.

Hiring, doctoral studies 

Our institution is hiring doctoral students in humanities and social sciences. It's not listed as focus area for the whole university, but our department is also part of the Centre of Excellence in Game Culture Studies, so is also well represented.

rekry.saima.fi/certiahome/open

CfP, game studies 

If you want to come to Finland and talk about games, take a look at this CfP for DiGRA 2020, taking place June 2–6 next year.

digra2020.org/

Conference, game studies 

DiGRA2020 (the yearly conference for game studies scholars) conference was just announced to be in Tampere, Finland, June 2-6.

Game studies meta, boredom 

A group of game scholars has written the Ludic Boredom Manifesto, saying that fun has had a too large role in game studies.

Game citations in game studies 

Jonathan Frome and Paul Martin looked through Game studies & Games and Culture and found that:

• 89% cite games
• Most cited games were: World of Warcraft, Grand Theft Auto, Chess (top 3 in order)

Conference, game studies 

Spending this week in Japan, for , the yearly conference for scholars, including the , which focuses on studying role-playing games. Expect confused, alarmed and surprised toots about games this week, in Kyoto time.

Book chapter, game studies, philosophy 

My book chapter “Playing the Nonhuman – Alien Experiences in Aliens vs. Predator” is now available from Taylor & Francis. If you just want to read the chapter, you can find it on my website.

gamephilosophy.org/2019/07/boo

Game studies, RPG studies 

We've published most of the author's copies for the role-playing game studies book "Role-Playing Game Studies: Transmedia Foundations." Take a look at this list, if you're interested:

nitessine.wordpress.com/2019/0

I think games are better at expressing some things than other media. I list some examples, but I probably missed others, so please tell me what I missed.

jonne.arjoranta.fi/2019/best-e

My article "How to Define Games and Why We Need to" is now available from The Computer Games Journal. Struggling with game definitions? Try if this helps.

link.springer.com/article/10.1

cfp, celebrities, gaming, game studies 

Studying people in games?

"Celebrities of Gaming" is a conference organised November 21-22, 2019 at the university of Jyväskylä, Finland. You can find the CFP from the link:

jyu.fi/hytk/fi/laitokset/mutku

game studies, definitions, Wittgenstein 

You can find a preprint version of my paper "How to Define Games and Why" here:

doi.org/10.31235/osf.io/abhdm

If you have any comments, questions or suggestions on how to make it better, I would love to hear them.

game studies, article publication 

Our paper "Games as Blends: Understanding Hybrid Games" is now available as an open access publication from the Journal of Virtual Reality and Broadcasting. It uses cognitive semiotics to make sense of hybrid games.

jvrb.org/past-issues/14.2017/4

game studies, conference 

On my way to Bergen today for Nordic DiGRA. Looking forward to all the transgressive game studies (that's the theme this year). digranordic2018.w.uib.no/

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