Psychiatric care in developing countries, depression, suicide 

This article mentions the anecdote of Erica, a 24-year-old Zimbabwean woman who had killed herself. The exchange between Erica's mother and Dr. Chibanda, who had treated Erica before and had asked to see her as soon as possible on hearing of a prior, unsuccessful suicide attempt, is haunting:

"Why didn’t you bring her to see me as we planned?” Chibanda asked.

“We didn’t have bus fare,” the mother said.

theguardian.com/society/2019/a

In 2006, [Chibanda] told the city health department he wanted to start a mental health programme there.

Neither the department nor the clinic staff were enthusiastic. “The clinic told me the nurses were too busy,” Chibanda said. “And there was no space for me to work inside the building.” So he set up a bench in the yard.

Grudgingly, the clinic lent Chibanda the services of its “Grannies” – middle-aged or older women with little education, who earn a small stipend doing community health work.

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Broke: Freud's couch
Woke: Chibanda and the Grannies on a bench

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They're called friendship benches I'm sobbing

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