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Hi everybody! I am a design writer who recently finished my MA in Acoustical Studies at Johns Hopkins. My research revolves around intersections between late modern architecture, sound studies, and acoustics from 1960-1980.

I try to read an architecture theory essay every day, and will mostly be posting about that.

I'm currently writing an article about populism and architecture in the digital age.

Nice to meet you!

New users here, so I'll start regularly posting bits of Mastodon etiquette!

One thing that might be new is having to think about what privacy setting to use for your posts

For a lot of posts, you probably want Unlisted—not Public!

Unlisted posts go to your followers and they're boostable; off-topic posts are allowed and encouraged

Public posts go on the Local Timeline; and for scholar.social, Public posts should be "on topic" (topic is: academia, teaching, learning—if in doubt, use a CW)

If you're interested in my impulsive, polemical, political streams of consciousness, consider following @mcmansionhell

Links to McMansion Hell content and other articles I've published will be automatically cross posted to this account.

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The Scholar Social Community Standards apply to all users of this instance

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The most egregious thing about a lot of academic writing is that it comes from a place of “mild curiosity,” denying that which emerges from the need to survive.

Unpaywall is a handy little open source project, available to use as a browser extension, which makes it easier to find open access copies of journal papers.

I just thought I'd share this here for those who may need it. I find it very useful!

unpaywall.org/

Rereading Henri Lefebvre's "Toward an Architecture of Enjoyment" today. The passage in the first chapter (page 5) about the bourgeois apartment being read as a private substitute for certain parts of urban life is still quite applicable to how we can read the internal ideology of upscale housing today.

I hope this makes sense and I'm not just spitballing ideas into the void. This is for an essay I'm currently writing that will be published next month.

Really the lens through which these subjects are viewed today is not much different than the one Crane is criticizing in 1845: a search for moments of beauty in the material or architectural signifiers of industrial (and now post-industrial) capitalism (as opposed to building a world where beauty becomes something we no longer need to hunt for in the hostile landscape that has robbed us of it in the first place.)

This is from "The Claims of Decorative Art" page 13-14. While I don't necessarily agree with the moralist angle here, I've been toying with the idea that this can certainly be applied as a historical reference in an analysis of the rise of media dealing with subjects of decay and abandonment, such as popular urban exploration blogs whose subjects are often the same 19th and 20th century industrial structures referenced here by Crane.

These days, I think often of this bit from Arts-and-Crafts thinker Walter Crane about what he called the 'art of accident, "... which is really what modern [continued in image]

yes, I am also the person who made the McMansion Hell website.

Hi everybody! I am a design writer who recently finished my MA in Acoustical Studies at Johns Hopkins. My research revolves around intersections between late modern architecture, sound studies, and acoustics from 1960-1980.

I try to read an architecture theory essay every day, and will mostly be posting about that.

I'm currently writing an article about populism and architecture in the digital age.

Nice to meet you!

Scholar Social

A Mastodon instance for academics

Scholar Social is a microblogging platform for researchers, grad students, librarians, archivists, undergrads, academically inclined high schoolers, educators of all levels, journal editors, research assistants, professors, administrators—anyone involved in academia who is willing to engage with others respectfully.

We strive to be a safe space for queer people and other minorities, recognizing that there can only be academic freedom where the existence and validity of interlocutors' identities is taken as axiomatic.

"A Mastodon profile you can be proud to put on the last slide of a presentation at a conference"

"Official" monthly journal club!

(Participation is, of course, optional)

Scholar Social features a monthly "official" journal club, in which we try to read and comment on a paper of interest.

Any user of Scholar Social can suggest an article by sending the DOI by direct message to @socrates@scholar.social and one will be chosen by random lottery on the last day of the month. We ask that you only submit articles that are from *outside* your own field of study to try to ensure that the papers we read are accessible and interesting to non-experts.

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