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Heya presenters for - make sure to confirm your times that have been emailed to you

We need to start getting moderators for your talks!

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Greetings Fediverse, It is good to be here in such as a sea of creativity and brilliance. l am a publisher/editor/writer with a specialization in women beat poets, women's history, Chaucer and Cicero. I try to unredact the history of those who were left out, ignored or edited out. And there are many.

On the other hand, I was thinking about surreal numbers all day today :p

Ended up sending two research proposals today (one of them was ind of unexpected, but the deadline caught up with me)

9) hyper-competitiveness and anti-collaborative
10) high-wtakes/low-stakes.

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4) culture of negative feedback,
5) overwork and unevenly distributed and hidden emotional labour,
6) achievement-focused,
7) managerialism without management,
8) culture of perfectionism,

[cont.]

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What MD hypothesizes are the causes of mental health in philosophy:

1) illusion of autonomy (you have to focus on things that are publishable, or can give outputs, or can get you a job - same with adopting teaching strategies and methods), so you end up bound to do things that hurt you, ["you can have your autonomy if you come up with the goods"]
2) being subject to arbitrary decisions,
3) prestige sensitivity,

[cont.]

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Problem: professional philosophy should be a satisfying/gratifying job. But: mental health issues (stress, burnout, depression, anxiety) are commonplace among people in the field. Why? No decent studies so far. But some indication of a growing problem across academic disciplines.

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A talk on "The Philosophy Profession and Mental Health" by Matt Duncombe (Notthngham). Will make some comments here.

In the Q&A, QC accepts that it may seem to be in the nature of philosophy that it is difficult to determine whether one has a solution to a problem, when: it is a fact that many previous solutions have failed, problems are themselves somewhat undeterminate. This connects with the issue that philosophers value originality very highly. But how can we even say that our thoughts are original?

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How to deal with it?

The solution does not lie with the individual.

What is needed is structural change. We need to internalize the message that we do not need to be a genius to do philosophy. We need more collaborative work.

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On the cult of genius: given the emphasis on cleverness, "it is difficult for us mere mortals that we are not good enough".

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One example of the second: the NYU Mind and Language seminar. 3 hours, pre-read, starts with one hour of comments from faculty, followed by 2 hours of comments by graduate students. QC recalls that in his experience, this is grueling. Include, after this, talk about the issues before the talk, and after the talk (over dinner included). "An assault that lasts 10 hours". Students gain kudos by giving the speaker a hard time.

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What about the culture of philosophy causes this?. A bunch of factors: a) "a chronic lack of diversity in terms of race, gender, and social class", b) "a macho performance culture that disproportionately rewards speed and destructiveness", you can distinguish yourself by being good at negative feedback, c) "a cult of genius and accompanying intellectual brutalism".

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There might be general issues with academia that rises the prevalence of IS. But within philosophy, there might be more specific reasons.

QC raises three hypotheses: a) both IS and OS are more prevalent in philosophy than in some other subjects, b) this is not due to the nature of philosophy, but due to the norms and culture of philosophy, c) (more tentative) IS is a greater problem in analytic philosophy than in other kinds of philosophy.

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QC relates imposter syndrome to what he calls "outsider syndrome": the feeling that you do not belong, a form of alienation. This does not have the performance component that imposter syndrome exhibits. It might be a risk factor for IS. (cf. Falbo & Stewart, blog.apaonline.org/2020/03/10/).

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