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Howdy researchers & info-hunters: what's the strangest fact you've come across recently in your research?

· brutaldon · 4 · 3 · 6

@rusty Gramsci had 11 teeth fall out while imprisoned also his mother hung him from the ceiling by his ankles thinking that would straighten his spine

@Cyborgneticz Woah! The teeth like just fell out? Malnourished or bad dental care?

@rusty all of that and he was just a sick person so that didn't help

@rusty The human eye can't process light quickly enough to really see the position of fast moving objects. If the visual system processed light "literally," we would always perceive tennis balls as being multiple feet behind their actual position.

So instead, the cells of our retinas send a made-up phantom signal to the brain that shows the location the tennis ball *would* be by the time visual processing is complete, assuming the ball moves in a straight line at constant speed. It's called "motion adaptation."

@activationfxn Woah! So our eyes don't really see what's there?!

@rusty In Early Modern England, commoner men would cross-dress and run through the woods at night in protest of the acts of enclosure. Don't ask me why, I don't completely understand the explanation given.

@rusty There are some species of songbird that have "critical periods" for learning songs, and they learn those songs from other members of their species. this means that they develop dialects! also, if you keep them in isolation during the critical period (a few months after hatching), they'll develop abnormal songs (which will then become regularized by future generations!)

youtube.com/watch?v=r5_ZSnFDPR

@nimirea Woah! Birds have dialects?!! That's amazing...

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