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Fred Scharmen @[email protected]

u were so preoccupied browsing wikihow u never stopped to think if u should browse wikishould

A very nice summary of some of the reasons why we actually have no idea of what life on Earth has looked through its dilated history: bbc.com/future/story/20180215- .For all we know, desert-dwelling winged toasters may have dominated the Earth during the entire Mesozoic having dinosaurs as their faithful pets.

Ch. 1 of , "Topology: Future Primitives and the Shape of Space" is a primer on the many different ways that "space" away from planetary surfaces disrupts our preconceptions about space in general, here near Earth where we're used to being.

The introduction tells the story of the project's inception, which goes right to the book's core questions: How, and why, do we try to make "new" space? And who is this new space *for* anyway?

On the periphery of the story I'm telling, are all sorts of people from the worlds of design, science fiction, science, and counterculture: like Rachel Carson, Carl Sagan, Larry Niven, Jane Jacobs, Bucky Fuller, and Le Corbusier.

The principle people involved were Gerard O'Neill, who had been working on these concepts for six years already, and two painters/designers, architect Rick Guidice, and space science illustrator don Davis.

is about the design project that resulted in these public domain paintings. These were the products of a 1975 Summer Study sponsored by NASA (and, indirectly, by Stewart Brand. More on that later) settlement.arc.nasa.gov/70sArt

So here's a thread about the book project I'm working on, called , due out late this year from Columbia Books on Architecture and the City.

After six hours straight of doing citations, now trying and failing to find something to read before bed in which I won’t hallucinate echoes of my research topic in ...

Consensus seems to be that Zotero is great for citations, which I can confirm. The auto-ISBN lookup is magic.

Does anyone use Zotero for file management and citations? Any advice for someone just getting started?

Had one of those dreams that’s like “I’m back in grad school, and I’ve got to do one more design studio project to finish”

Maybe I'll post some book draft excerpts here over the next week while I'm doing citations ...

Book Status (Space Settlements): about 35,000 words in on the first draft manuscript, out of a projected 52,000. For the next two weeks, taking a break from draft writing to do citations, outline the remaining 2 chapters and conclusion, and package it for peer review via the publisher (Columbia Books on Architecture and the City).

Current Status: putting together a tenure track application package whilst super sleepy and fighting a cold.

Ancient Scottish curse: "may your cell phone only work when you're demonstrating the problem to the repairman"

Also today: begging my students in the online course I'm teaching to participate more in the discussion forums. Like, literally begging.

Today: arranged to have the sketch archives of two designers scanned and recorded digitally. Finished and sent one grant application, and started another.