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Sorry, but I don't approve anonymous follows. If your profile is blank and you have no public interaction, I can't tell you from a bot or a troll, so no.

- us weather: florida, urgent 

Get out of the Tampa Bay area now.

Map via weather.gov/srh/tropical

Psyched to be listening in on another ISAW/NYU dissertation defense! This time Christine Roughan on "The Little Astronomy and Middle Books between the 2nd and 13th Centuries CE”.

Registration now open for "Linked Pasts VII ... a hybrid symposium, [which] brings together scholars, heritage professionals and other practitioners with an interest in Linked Open Data as applied to the study of the ancient and historical world. The event will take place "in person in York, UK from 29 November to 1 December 2022, along with asynchronous online participation taking place 24-28 November."

Registration deadline is 1 October 2022: seadda.eu/?p=1808

death of a scholar 

I see that the ISAW/NYU library has posted "a brief obituary of the pioneering Nina Garsoïan (1923-2022), who blazed new trails as both a scholar and an academic leader. She was a major donor to the library."

isaw.nyu.edu/library/blog/Gars

Remember: Malware Bytes tried to warn us, but we dismissed it as "mistaken".

The latest ISAW/NYU exhibition (Ritual and Memory: The Ancient Balkans and Beyond) opened to the public today. We also rolled out all the web components, including a media-rich "digital complement" and illustrated checklist of objects. Access here: isaw.nyu.edu/exhibitions/ritua

We just published the notification that ISAW/NYU's fall exhibition "Ritual and Memory: The Ancient Balkans and Beyond (presented by The First Kings of Europe Project)" opens to the public tomorrow, September 21, 2022:

isaw.nyu.edu/exhibitions

It will run through February 19, 2023. The full online component of the exhibition, including images of all objects displayed, will be published soon (I'll announce that too).

online lecture about ancient Crete 

I see that ISAW at NYU has just announced an online lecture by visiting professor Dominic Pollard entitled "From the Ground Up: Questions of Subsistence, Demography and Social Structure in Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age ".

Free, but advance registration required. More info here: isaw.nyu.edu/events/from-the-g

"Cross-instance Hellthread" is my new band name

h/t @c0debabe

death of a scholar 

Word has come from a friend in London that Joyce M. Reynolds, D.Litt Cambridge, the eminent epigraphist has died this morning, aged 103. An experimenter and early skeptic of computational methods in , later in her career, Reynolds became an influential figure in the adoption of XML ( and ) for epigraphic publication.

Sit tibi terra levis.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joyce_Re


I see that the EAMENA project (Endangered Archaeology in the Middle East and North Africa) is offering a six-week-long, online course on using “satellite imagery to identify and assess endangered archaeological sites in the Middle East and North Africa.”

See further: futurelearn.com/courses/endang


TFW the Tabula Imperii Byzantini's awesome Toponym Register, which you hoped would help you sort out which of the two Ilıca's you've been given is which, gives you ten, only one of which appears to be one of the two you already have.

tib.oeaw.ac.at/tib-register/ti

I see that the ISAW news blog is now reporting that P. Davoli's Amheida 6: The House of Sirenos, Part 2 has now been published:

isaw.nyu.edu/news/amheida06-se

This is "the second volume dedicated to the of the large élite residence ... at Amheida, or the ancient city of Trimithis, in the Dakhla Oasis of the Western Desert of Egypt."

TFW the progress dialog reads “986 bytes of 2K - Estimating time remaining…” for a long time

"For the first time, astronomers have used NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope to take a direct image of a planet outside our solar system. The exoplanet is a gas giant ... called HIP 65426 b, [and] is about six to 12 times the mass of Jupiter."

blogs.nasa.gov/webb/2022/09/01

- survey results on harassment in Classics: "endemic and persistent" 

"Only 3.2% of these incidents of harassment resulted in consequences for the person responsible."

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- survey results on harassment in Classics: "endemic and persistent" 

"A common theme ... while the respondent was a student was predatory behavior and demeaning or sexual remarks from male faculty in positions of power over them. Contingent and non-tenured faculty were also a major target of harassment: 34.6% of reported incidents occurred to members at this career stage, ... most common theme was, again, of men of higher rank perpetrating ... acts against women of lower rank."

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- survey results on harassment in Classics: "endemic and persistent" 

Absolutely devastating (if disgustingly unsurprising) report on harassment in Classics:

"40.9% of SCS members responded to the survey. Of this group, 48.9% reported incidents of harassment that made them feel uncomfortable or afraid, with 80.4% of that number reporting five or more such incidents. 76% of these reported incidents were based on the gender of the respondent, and 85.4% occurred when ..."

classicalstudies.org/scs-blog/

Apropos of nothing, there are some quasi-repetitive data fields in serialization formats precisely because we didn't want to break anybody's integration/downstream reuse code when we updated/improved ours. And we're way more niche than those guys.

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