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Hello everyone, my name is Tamara (she/her), I am a PhD student in cultural anthropology and my research focusses on the development of artificial intelligence in the context of humanoid robotics. To really get a grasp of what is going on, I also study computer science and program parts of the robots’ software myself.

I am new here and would love to connect with people working on similar or related topics!

One real advantage of all academic events happening online is that you can take part in many different events held in different places in one day. Tomorrow I’ll be starting with a workshop held in Southern Germany in the morning, then listen to a lecture in Central Germany half an hour later, and spend the evening listening to talks and discussions in Atlanta!

Hi scholar.social, Hi fediverse!
Mark here from Delft, Netherlands. I just started a PhD to research socio-technical enablers/inhibitors of software testing. In the next 4 years I will look into how and why developers do (not) test software. I am particularly interested in the social dimensions of this which is why I'm also curious to learn more about ethnographic research methods.

Looking forward to be a part of the scholar.social community to connect and share insights!

Hey 👋 Quick PSA for people working/interested in , , , , , or any other Cognitive Science related field:

You can get a year of Pay What You Can membership to the Cognitive Science Society (meaning: if you can’t afford the membership, no problem... it’s free!) 👇

twitter.com/cogsci_soc/status/

So, I decided to take next week off – which sounds unspectacular but feels like quite a rebellious act in the first year of my PhD. Do you manage to regularly take time off from academia? If so, how often? And how do you manage to not do the 1000 tasks that are still waiting to be done?

I will be presenting my work on privacy-respecting artificial intelligence for a non-expert audience at Falling Walls Lab Leuven on April 1st

kuleuven.be/communicatie/weten

Robot (not-so-)fun fact of the week:

I really love Boston Dynamics’ dancing robot video. (youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&)

I mean, who doesn’t love dancing robots?

What should not be forgotten though, is that these fast-moving machines capable of working autonomously to some degree could, and probably eventually will, end up being used for more sinister purposes than a funny dance video, as for example the art project “Spot’s rampage” has recently highlighted. (spotsrampage.com/)

Robot (not-so-)fun fact:

In 2017, Saudi Arabia was the first country to grant citizenship to a humanoid robot. It has female features and is called Sophia. Contrary to human women in Saudi Arabia, Sophia does not have to adhere to a strict dress code or need an official male guardian to handle her legal affairs. I couldn’t find anything on the legal procedure to Sophia’s citizenship – it is however particularly interesting in a country which hardly ever grants this right to human foreigners.

Currently taking part in my uni's Long Night against Procrastination - can spending time on scholar.social be considered procrastination? :D

Hello everyone, my name is Tamara (she/her), I am a PhD student in cultural anthropology and my research focusses on the development of artificial intelligence in the context of humanoid robotics. To really get a grasp of what is going on, I also study computer science and program parts of the robots’ software myself.

I am new here and would love to connect with people working on similar or related topics!

Scholar Social

Scholar Social is a microblogging platform for researchers, grad students, librarians, archivists, undergrads, academically inclined high schoolers, educators of all levels, journal editors, research assistants, professors, administrators—anyone involved in academia who is willing to engage with others respectfully.